Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   

Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   Notes on an immortal being   

Trailer coming soon

Notes on an immortal being
Jaime Levinas

Featuring: Tina Makharadze & Giammarco Falcone
Written and directed by: Jaime Levinas
Director of Photography: Ruben Hamelink
Line Producer: Sara Halbertsma
Creative Producer: Inge de Leeuw
Production Designer: Rosie Stapel
Editing: Andrew Aaronson
Original music and Sound design: Noah Chevan

Inside the Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Antwerp, a vampire is hunted by the thoughts and visions of having to leave her beloved place.

Making of

Director

Jaime Levinas ARG/NL

Jaime Levinas is an Argentinean and Dutch film director and audio visual artist based in New York.
He graduated from the MFA program in film directing at Brooklyn College as a Fulbright grantee and Prins Bernhard Cultuur Fonds fellow. His short film Midnight Coffee (2020) was selected for multiple festivals such as IFFR, Maryland, Sydney Underground and others. His new film PINPIN (2021) will be premiering in Clermont-Ferrand at the International Competition section.

Architectural project

The architectural project

Royal Museum of Fine Arts ongoing

Built in the 19th century, Antwerp’s Royal Museum of Fine Arts was conceived as a ‘daylight museum’ by architects Winders and Van Dyck. During the 20th century, the building underwent many fundamental changes in the layout, modifying the original circulation route and the connection with the city. Our intervention aims to reverse these spatial changes by combining a thorough renovation of the historic museum with a contemporary extension completely concealed within the existing structure. A complete overhaul of the 19th-century building restores the intrinsic qualities of the space by reinstating original colours, materials and routing within the historic halls. Guests can walk through an enfilade of exhibition rooms tinted in dark pink, green and red; oak doors, tall columns and ceiling ornaments in plasterwork convey a feeling of ancient grandeur. Meanwhile, hidden in the heart of the old building, a new vertical museum arises as a completely autonomous entity built within the four original patios. With bright white exhibition halls, hidden rooms, long staircases, far-reaching sightlines and varying gradations of daylight, the new museum charts a route full of surprising vertical experiences. Wherever the new extension ‘cuts’ the museum’s solid mass, subtle marble inlays have been added, echoing the elegant 19th-century museum’s materiality. These contrasting yet dialoguing entities coexist as two different worlds in one building, sharing the ability to unveil themselves little by little. The experience is never predictable and always in balance, both routes are challenging and at the service of the art.